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Kamis, 13 Mei 2021

Eid al-Fitr prayer with health protocols in Indonesia - Anadolu Agency

Eid al-Fitr prayer with health protocols in Indonesia - Anadolu Agency

Eid al-Fitr prayer with health protocols in IndonesiaFoto─čraf: Eko Siswono Toyudho

DEPOK, INDONESIA - MAY 13: Indonesian Muslims wear protective face masks and maintain social distancing attend the Eid al-Fitr prayer amid the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic at Kubah Emas Mosque in Depok, West Java province, Indonesia on May 13, 2021. ( Eko Siswono Toyudho - Anadolu Agency )



2021-05-13 03:36:05Z
https://www.aa.com.tr/en/pg/photo-gallery/eid-al-fitr-prayer-with-health-protocols-in-indonesia/0

Masked and restricted by COVID-19, Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr - Reuters

Masked and restricted by COVID-19, Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr - Reuters

(Reuters) -Muslims across the world celebrated Eid al-Fitr with masks and prayers, as conflicts and coronavirus restrictions cast shadows over the festival’s mass gatherings and family reunions.

Muslims pray outside the closed National Mosque while celebrating Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim festival marking the end the holy fasting month of Ramadan, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia May 13, 2021. REUTERS/Lim Huey Teng

Many COVID-hit countries, including Pakistan, India, Malaysia and Indonesia imposed curbs, shut shops and even some mosques - though the numbers out praying were higher than in 2020 when lockdowns all but cancelled events.

“(We are) very lucky that we can pray together this year, when we couldn’t do it last year,” said Tri Haryati Ningsih, 53, at the Dian Al-Mahri mosque in the Indonesian city of Depok, south of the capital Jakarta.

“Hopefully, the coronavirus will pass quickly and we can always worship together,” she added.

In a typical year, millions would travel to their hometowns to celebrate the end of the fasting month of Ramadan with their families, and crowd into markets and malls sharing greetings and sweets.

In Depok, the faithful wore masks as they arrived and sanitised their hands before going in.

At the entrance, a poster outlining six steps recommended by the World Health Organisation to prevent the spread of COVID-19 served as a reminder of the danger.

SHADOW OF CONFLICT

Many Muslims also marked Eid under the shadow of conflict, past and present.

Slideshow ( 3 images )

In Gaza the usual excitement of Eid turned to mourning for some after a heavy night of Israeli air strikes during the fiercest flare-up in years. Medics have put the death toll in the enclave at 83 so far this week.

“Every year, we would dress up and make visits. This year we will not go anywhere,” said 20-year-old Basma Al-Farra in Khan Younis refugee camp.

Rockets and missiles in dizzying numbers have been exchanged since Monday between Hamas militants in Gaza and Israel’s military across the enclave’s boundary, after the latest tensions related to land ownership in Jerusalem erupted into conflict.

In Afghanistan, the Taliban declared a three-day ceasefire for Eid just days after a bombing that killed 80 people, most of them schoolgirls.

Some children in Kabul enjoyed the festival at an amusement park, shrieking with delight as they rode carousels and high-flying swings.

“Afghanistan is unfortunately involved in war and insecurity, but the people are delighted with this three-day ceasefire,” said Noorulah Stanikzai, a young resident of Kabul relaxing at the park with his friends.

In the Iraqi city of Mosul, which was badly damaged in the long war between Iraqi forces and the Islamic State militant group that ended in 2017, worshippers gathered in the historic but largely ruined 7th century al-Masfi mosque.

Eid prayers were held there for the first time since parts of it were reduced to rubble. The prayers were instigated by a local group of volunteers to help amplify their calls for the Old City to be rebuilt.

“We are happy about Eid and other celebrations, but there is also heartbreak because of great destruction in Mosul until this day,” said Ayyub Dhanun, one of the volunteers.

“This is an invitation to rebuild this monument and to compensate Mosul residents by rebuilding their houses in old Mosul.”

Reporting by Reuters bureaux in countries mentioned; Writing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa and Estelle Shirbon; Editing by Andrew Heavens



2021-05-13 09:45:00Z
https://www.reuters.com/article/religion-eid-int/masked-and-restricted-by-covid-19-muslims-celebrate-eid-al-fitr-idUSKBN2CU0V7

Selasa, 11 Mei 2021

Fatigued, unable to focus, students unsure about universities reopening soon - Jakarta Post

Fatigued, unable to focus, students unsure about universities reopening soon - Jakarta Post

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Pychita Julinanda

PREMIUM

Jakarta   ●   Wed, May 12 2021

Student Revin Muhammad was in the early days of his second semester when the COVID-19 pandemic hit and classes moved online. University life should have been fun, a time of transitioning into adulthood with the wide-eyed vigor of a teen - eager to study hard and confident in pursuing dreams. Alas, the 20-year-old, like many others, has had to avoid physical socializing and learning.

“I do miss my friends,” Revin admitted, “and I have quite a fear of missing out. Especially due to the fact that I now live in Bandung, whereas most of my [university] friends are in Jakarta. When I see them hanging out, I want to join them.”

Revin studies international relations at the University of Indonesia (UI) in Depok, West Java, on the outskirts of Jakarta.

Missing his friends is not the only reason Revin is eager for universities to reopen soon....

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2021-05-11 18:04:09Z
https://www.thejakartapost.com/paper/2021/05/11/fatigued-unable-to-focus-students-unsure-about-universities-reopening-soon.html

Fatigued, unable to focus, students unsure about universities reopening soon - Jakarta Post

Fatigued, unable to focus, students unsure about universities reopening soon - Jakarta Post

share this article

Share this article

PREMIUM

Jakarta   ●   Wed, May 12 2021

Student Revin Muhammad was in the early days of his second semester when the COVID-19 pandemic hit and classes moved online. University life should have been fun, a time of transitioning into adulthood with the wide-eyed vigor of a teen - eager to study hard and confident in pursuing dreams. Alas, the 20-year-old, like many others, has had to avoid physical socializing and learning.

“I do miss my friends,” Revin admitted, “and I have quite a fear of missing out. Especially due to the fact that I now live in Bandung, whereas most of my [university] friends are in Jakarta. When I see them hanging out, I want to join them.”

Revin studies international relations at the University of Indonesia (UI) in Depok, West Java, on the outskirts of Jakarta.

Missing his friends is not the only reason Revin is eager for universities to reopen soon....

to Read Full Story

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Starting from IDR 55,000/month

  • Unlimited access to our content on web and app
  • No advertising, no interruption
  • A bonus subscription to share
  • Bookmark and night mode functions on app
  • Subscription to our newsletters


2021-05-11 18:03:48Z
https://www.thejakartapost.com/paper/2021/05/11/fatigued-unable-to-focus-students-unsure-about-universities-reopening-soon.html

Sabtu, 08 Mei 2021

Depok villagers behead 'babi ngepet' shapeshifting boar demon accused of stealing money - Coconuts Jakarta

Depok villagers behead 'babi ngepet' shapeshifting boar demon accused of stealing money - Coconuts Jakarta

A shapeshifting boar demon was beheaded in Depok, West Java after it stole money and valuables over the past month.

At least, that’s what the residents of Badahan village in Sawangan sub-district believe, but their story about a babi ngepet terrorizing their village has become national news in a country with deep supernatural traditions as Indonesia.

In Indonesian lore, a babi ngepet is a person who uses a black magic-infused cloak to transform into a wild boar. In boar form, they would sneak into people’s homes and rub their bodies on the walls and furniture, which would magically draw the household’s money and valuables. When the babi ngepet shifts back to human form, the stolen fortune is contained in the cloak.

The villagers of Badahan were certain that only a babi ngepet could’ve been responsible for their money going missing over the past month. On Monday, 12 men of the village went butt-naked — because they believe that’s the only way they could see the demon with their own eyes, for some reason — and found the babi ngepet, which they captured and caged.

While the villagers initially wanted their fortune back, they said they saw the beast gradually shrinking. So they decided to kill it before it could vanish.

In a video that has gone viral, a respected figure at the village is seen calling on the babi ngepet’s family to come forward before the villagers execute it.

https://twitter.com/mawakresna/status/1387040275160129536?s=20

Nobody came forward, so the villagers beheaded the boar yesterday and buried the body parts separately so they don’t somehow magically fuse back together. Nobody has come forward to report any of their family members missing, presumably from their tragic babi ngepet adventures, either.

Now, we hope we don’t have to tell you that this story was entirely based on the claims of the villagers, and that nobody besides them actually saw the so-called babi ngepet. Nevertheless, the local police got involved and said that the boar they saw was just a regular swine.

“We were worried that the whole thing attracted crowds, so we dispersed them as we are still in the COVID-19 pandemic,” Sawangan Police Chief Rio Mikael Tobing said.

Yet the story still broke nationwide to the point that the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) had to come forward and say that there is no such thing as a babi ngepet.

It’s possible that the babi ngepet was made a scapegoat (or scapeboar, as it were) by the villagers who have been hit hard economically by the pandemic. If that were the case, who are we to deny them this temporary distraction from their circumstances?

Read the latest news on Coconuts Jakarta



2021-04-28 07:00:00Z
https://coconuts.co/jakarta/news/depok-villagers-behead-babi-ngepet-shapeshifting-boar-demon-accused-of-stealing-money/